Why? Akron Art Museum!

***A bit of blogkeeping: Congratulations to alithearchitect (Comment #7), randomly-selected winner of two tickets to MIX: Form at the Cleveland Museum of Art! Please check your email and respond by the end of the day or a new winner will be chosen. If you didn’t win, you can still purchase tickets here.***

Last night, Matthew and I had the chance to participate in the Akron Art Museum’s first digital media night. I had never been to the Akron Art Museum, so this provided a great chance to check out their very cool space.

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The exhibit we got a chance to tour is called Real/Surreal: The Elusive American Dream, organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art, and features both realist and surrealist art from the 1920’s through the 1950’s. Museum curator Janice Driesbach took us through the exhibit.

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The exhibit features artwork that clearly falls into either the realist or surrealist genre, as well as artwork that bridges both.

Jared French, State Park, 1946, egg tempera on composition board, sight: 23 1/2 x 23 1/2 in. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Donnelley Erdman 65.78 Photography by Sheldan C. Collins
Jared French, State Park, 1946, egg tempera on composition board, sight: 23 1/2 x 23 1/2 in. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Donnelley Erdman 65.78 Photography by Sheldan C. Collins

One of my favorite parts of the exhibit was the surrealist photography. I didn’t think of photography as anything but capturing the real, so it was interesting to see photographs in a different way.

Another painting that caught our attention is this one below. It is meant to be a surreal representation of the Berlin Olympics, but as Communications Assistant Bridgette pointed out, it also looks a bit like a scene from “Harry Potter.” Just an example of how we bring our own experiences to bear on what we see in art!

Federico Castellón, The Dark Figure, 1938, oil on canvas, Overall: 17 3/8 x 26 1/4 x 1 1/8in. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 42.3 Permission courtesy Michael Rosenfeld  Gallery LLC, N.Y. Photography by Sheldan C. Collins
Federico Castellón, The Dark Figure, 1938, oil on canvas, Overall: 17 3/8 x 26 1/4 x 1 1/8in. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 42.3 Permission courtesy Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, N.Y. Photography by Sheldan C. Collins

Real/Surreal is on display at the Akron Museum of Art through November 3, 2013.

We also checked out a couple of the museum’s other exhibits, including Line Color Illusion: 40 Years of Julian Stanczak and With a Trace: Photographs of Absence. As Julian Stanczak maintains a studio in Seven Hills, where I grew up, it was particularly neat to see his works on display in a gallery setting.

Julian Stanczak, It’s Not Easy Being Green, 1980-2000, acrylic on canvas, 57 in. x 57 in., Rory and Dedee O'Neil Acquisition Fund 2013.1, Image Source - akronartmuseum.org
Julian Stanczak, It’s Not Easy Being Green, 1980-2000, acrylic on canvas, 57 in. x 57 in., Rory and Dedee O’Neil Acquisition Fund 2013.1, Image Source – akronartmuseum.org

After our tour, we stopped at Crave, which is within walking distance of the museum. While the entrees were expensive, the salads and sandwiches were reasonable and tasty. I chose the duck confit salad with grilled pears, goat cheese, and almonds for $9 and Matthew’s pulled pork and sweet potato fries were $11. It made a good end to a nice evening in the 330!

I definitely recommend a trip down to Akron to check out all the Akron Art Museum has to offer!

***Disclosure: I was invited to attend the Akron Art Museum’s digital media night event with a guest. Some images provided by the Akron Art Museum. As always, all opinions are 100% my own.***

jenclesig_pur

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2 Responses

  1. This looks like such an amazing exhibit! Totally right up my alley. I’ve never been to the Akron Museum of Art before, althought I frequent CMA. I’ll have to use this as my reason to get down there and check out. Thanks for sharing!

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